MLSS Temperature Probe on HMCS Annapolis Retrieved

MLSS Director Glen Dennison and Vancouver Aquarium marine biologist Laura Borden recovered and redeployed the temperature logger that had been installed on the HMCS Annapolis artificial reef in Halkett Bay. The ship was deployed by the Artificial Reef Society of BC in 2015. The logger was in good condition and was reset back into the exact…

Aquatica Submarines Celebrates Launch of Stingray 500

MLSS Directors participated in Aquatica Submarines’ media launch of the Stingray 500 manned submersible. Over 300 people were in attendance. MLSS, along with eight other sponsors, set up a table display with video and posters help Aquatic celebrate the occasion. Good food, good conversation and a good time was had by all! In April, Glen…

First Exploration of Anvil Island bioherm

April 30th 2016 The first ever diver exploration on the Anvil Island giant sponge bioherm was completed.  Divers Hamish Tweed and Chris Straub dropped an amazing 255 feet onto the top of the sponge reef and recorded about 10 minutes of video at the site. The day was sunny and calm at the site with a…

Halkett Bioherm Temperature update

Sunday April 3 2016, we completed a successful dive on the Halkett bioherm and recovered the temperature logger. Dive conditions were a bit tough with strong currents and poor vis to 80ft. Here is what the temperatures were doing down in the Halkett bioherm from last July 12 2015 – April 3 2016 Looks like…

Nature Wild Magazine and Cloud Sponges

MLSS offered a Beach Interpretation Program at Porteau Cove BC for the Eastern Fraser Valley Young Naturalists Club, one of about 60 clubs throughout BC. The umbrella society for these clubs NatureKids of BC (previously The YNC, Young Naturalists’ Club of BC) puts out an awesome magazine called NatureWILD. The issue this month features a great article…

Halloween Sponge and UBC Students

Halloween day, and into the dark forbidding ocean depths the MLSS drop camera descended.  It was searching for the sponge bioherms at Kelvin Grove triple seamount. Oceanographic biologist Lena Clayton and MLSS director Glen Dennison hosted the UBC environmental sciences (ENVR 400) student team on an expedition to study glass sponge. The students spent over…

Lost Reef Bioherm temperature update

The dive team of Scott Meixner, Julian Goss, Kim Ansell and Cam Jackson, recovered and reinstalled the Lost Reef bioherm temperature logger. The underwater visibility was approaching 45 feet and  ocean current were low making for good diving conditions. The maximum depths of the divers was about 110 feet, with above average nature lighting conditions…

Kelvin Grove glass sponges at risk from damage by fishing gear

May 23 2015, in the early morning a commercial prawn fishing vessel deployed a longline set of prawn traps over the Kelvin Grove sponge bioherm near Lions Bay. Drop camera footage (see video above) has documented high abundance of glass sponges in this area, with some large sponges likely over a metre tall. The sponge…

Temperatures at Lions Bay sea mount

Saturday August 1st   Floating over the  Lions Bay sea mount, oceanographic biologist Lena Clayton and MLSS director Glen Dennison prepare to drop a temperature probe 415 feet down to the base of the Lions Bay sea-mount. The probe is rigged with an auto-release unit (AR unit) programmed to return the instrument package to the…

Halkett Bioherm Temperature Data Recovery – July 12, 2015

Sunday July 12, 2015 – an MLSS dive team recovered and replaced the Halkett reef sponge bed, thermochron logger. Note the 2 large temperature spikes in the data at the end of the graph.On casual observations the sponge bed did look healthy and seemed to be thriving. There was a large concentration of rockfish above…

Auto-Release Testing – June 6th 2015

After a successful cold soak of over 24 hours, the Auto Release unit returned to the surface from 415 feet underwater in the area west of Kelvin Grove. Placement on the drop and recovery is guided by the use of custom high resolution bottom maps. The unit assembly returned within 30 seconds of the programmed…